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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__107__A Brief History of the Pipe Organ
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 23, 2019, 08:00:25 AM »

The hydraulis of Dion
In 1992, the remains of a 1st-century B.C. hydraulis were found at Dion, an ancient Macedonian city near Mount Olympus, Greece, during excavations under Prof. D. Pantermalis.   This instrument consisted of 24 open pipes of different height with a conical lower ending.  The first 19 pipes have a height from 89 to 22 cm (35 to 8 inches).  Their inner diameter gradually decreases from 2 to 1.5 cm. These 19 pipes correspond to the "perfect system" of the ancient Greek music which consisted of one chromatic and one diatonic scale.   The pipes No. 20 to 24 are smaller and almost equal in height and they seem to form an extension of the diatonic scale.  The conical end of the pipes is inserted in a metal plate.  At a point just before the narrowing part of every pipe there is an opening producing the turbulence of the pressurized air and the sound.  The pipes are stabilized by two metal plates.   The one facing outwards has decorative motifs.   The instrument had one row of keys.   The lower part of the organ, with the air-pressing system, was missing.


Peter
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Jokes / Visit to Antiques Roadshow
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 23, 2019, 07:53:02 AM »
For those unfamiliar with The Antiques Roadshow - It is a popular BBC programme where people take their family treasures to have them valued.  The following presenter's question is often repeated on the show.




Paddy took 2 stuffed dogs to the Antiques Roadshow....

"Ah!" said the presenter, "This is a very rare breed, do you have any idea what they would fetch if they were in good condition?"

Paddy replied.....



Scroll down















"Sticks!"
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Jokes / Re: These older Texters
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 22, 2019, 08:34:33 AM »
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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__74___Chord Progressions 5-1 & 2-5-1
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 22, 2019, 08:31:11 AM »
Let us fit those 7 resultant chords in the key of C around the Circle of Fifths.


Now you can see how they relate to each other and how a progression can be structured.

With the note     C   =   1
                          D   =   2
                          E   =   3
                          F   =   4
                          G   =   5
                          A   =   6
                          B   =   7


You can easily work out how a    25-1 progression    is formed.

From the list above
       2   =    D
       5   =    G
       1   =    C


So for a    25-1 progression   you play chords of     Dm :  G or G7 :  C


And for a    6-2-5-1 progression , you simply add the first chord of
     6   =   A

so for a    6-2-5-1 progression ,   you play chords of       Am :  Dm :  G or G7 :  C etc.

I think you can now see clearly where this is going.......read on.

Peter
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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__103__A brief history of the electronic organ
« Last post by Robert McMichael on May 21, 2019, 01:22:03 PM »
Barbara Dennerlein is very entertaining!  I've watched a few of her youtube videos.

mac 8)
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Jokes / Re: These older Texters
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 21, 2019, 08:17:17 AM »
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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__103__A brief history of the electronic organ
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 21, 2019, 08:15:54 AM »
This draws to a conclusion this brief look at the History of the Electronic Organ.

I think....

Peter
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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__103__A brief history of the electronic organ
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 20, 2019, 10:02:39 AM »
Barbara Dennerlein plays Hammond B3



Peter
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Jokes / Re: These older Texters
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 20, 2019, 09:59:53 AM »
s
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Peter's Pearls / Re: No__107__A Brief History of the Pipe Organ
« Last post by Peter Anderson on May 19, 2019, 02:29:09 PM »

Ctesibius's invention demonstrates that, when technology makes significant advances, an innovation is always likely to follow.   

Because metalworking had been developed to a high degree, and the tools that were needed to fabricate precise components existed, though at this time, they were mostly wooden, this hardware was combined with the ancient flute to produce a keyboard instrument in which the musician could command more than one octave and was not limited by his lung power.

Ctesibios' most ingenious contribution, although its use declined after a few centuries because it was cumbersome, was a method of pumping and storing air at a controlled pressure while simultaneously eliminating fluctuations that would cause warbling and pitch changes in a wind instrument.   Air was stored in a relatively large plenum chamber immersed in a water bath.  Air was pumped in and allowed to bubble out of the bottom at a pressure that was stabilized by the hydrostatic head of water.

The air was supplied by a manually operated piston pump, that was fitted with a check valve.  This organ was called the "hydraulis" because it involved water.  Its operation involved a continuous airflow out of the bell jar, so the sound of bubbling water may have been an integral background to every musical performance.  Perhaps this was the first example of Water Music!

Two examples of the ancient hydraulis have been excavated.  One was discovered in the 1950s at the Roman settlement of Aquincum in Hungary.  Another was found in 1992 at an archaeological dig at Dion, a site in northern Greece at the foot of Mount Olympus. The Dion instrument has been studied extensively and a modern replica constructed by the European Cultural Centre of Delphi.

More about the Dion find and the replica are in the next two Replies.

Peter
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