Author Topic: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.  (Read 435 times)

Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2019, 01:33:45 AM »
Continuing with "Creating Style PARTS" ...

The first thing I had said when listening to the Bass PART of the original Style 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B was that I preferred a 'deeper' sounding Bass.  OK.  We'll change the VOICE for this PART to my preferred voice before we start changing/recording any PARTS.

If you have an AR, carry out the following steps (these are the same as the ones in my earlier post):

1.  Get the STYLE you want up on the screen.  In this case 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B from BALLAD.
2.  Press and hold the ACCOMP. PROGRAM button and press the BALLAD button in the STYLE section again.  Release both buttons.
3.  You will be in the BASIC screen in ACCOMP. PROGRAM.  By pressing the appropriate Data Control Button under the screen, move the highlight down from MAIN A to MAIN B.
4.  Press the button by RECORD.  By pressing the appropriate Data Control Buttons under the screen, put RHYTHM 1 and 2 onto PLAY; BASS onto PLAY; and all the others on MUTE.  Remember that the START tab on the left is an ON/OFF' toggle switch'.  So if you like, you can press the START now to hear the existing Bass PART.  Press START again to stop it.
5.  Press the button on the left of the screen next to VOICE.  The Voices Yamaha have chosen for this Style show across the bottom .. but not all Grand Piano as they are showing in this diagram!



The one chosen for the BASS in 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B is Fingered Bass.  By pressing the appropriate Data Control Button under the screen, move this UP one slot.  Acoustic Bass will now be showing.

How do you know what VOICES are available for you to choose from?  Well, there are 128 altogether, and these are listed on Page 125 of the USER MANUAL .. so you'll have to go and check them out!  Here are just a few of them in the Guitar and Bass sections:



If you like, you can press the START tab to hear what it sounds like with this change of Voice .. and press START again to stop it.

Please Note:  Whatever VOICE you choose for a PART, it will be the same for both MAIN A and MAIN B.  You can't have one VOICE for a PART in MAIN A and a different one in MAIN B.

Next .. I want to change the 'pattern' of that Bass PART to something not as 'busy, and more in keeping with the song I am playing.  So we now need to get the RECORD screen up again.  It's as we left it, with the RHYTHM and BASS Parts 'playing', and all the others on Mute.  I always keep Rhythm 1 and Rhythm 2 on PLAY as you have to have a 'beat' going to play your 'pattern' to.

To change the 'pattern' in a PART you first have to DELETE that PART so the slot is empty
.  So by using the appropriate Data Control Buttons under the screen, select DELETE, and confirm with OK.  We are now ready to record a new pattern for the Bass.

Well, not quite ready, as when we record our new 'pattern' we don't want to hear any other 'voices' playing with notes we press.  We just want to hear that Acoustic Bass.

1.  Make sure that the AUTO - BASS - CHORD is OFF.



2.  Make sure no 'voices' are routed through to the keys ie. All lights in ENSEMBLE are OFF.



Now we are ready to record that 'pattern'.

Press that START .. which remember is a 'toggle switch', so we press it again when we want to STOP.

IMPORTANT:  Look at the TEMPO/BAR BEAT indicator to the left of the main screen.  This performs several tasks.

1.  It tells you the TEMPO of the Rhythm you are about to play.  You can increase or decrease the TEMPO by pressing th UP and DOWN buttons on either side.  And by the way, if you didn't already know this, pressing those two buttons together will give you the 'default' Tempo Yamaha have given that particular Rhythm.



2.  It 'counts' where you are in the song you are playing.  The first number is the bar you have got to, and the second which beat in the bar you have got to.



3.  And this time it will count through the 'measure' of the 'pattern'.  So that first number progresses upwards as it goes through the 'measure' .. and then it goes back to 1 again and repeats itself.  So watch it counting through the bars for a bit (while you compose yourself), and when you're ready, play that Bass PART for the length of the measure.  Start playing the pattern at 1.1 and when it comes round to the 1.1 again don't play anything on that beat or you will get a 'double whammy' on that first beat.  See below for which notes to play for the 'pattern'.

Note:  All 'patterns' have to be done in the key of C.  In fact, I should say that you play notes 'in the harmony of C' as you have to pretend you are playing C harmony all the time you are recording.  So for my Bass 'pattern' (which you have already listened to earlier) I am playing this:

Click the below to listen.
My Bass Part 'measure', repeated

My 'pattern' is 6/8 time, and as I play by ear I am quietly counting 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 whilst playing the notes in the right place.



For those of you who read music, I asked Peter to put my pattern into 'music notation', which he has done for me (below).



OK.  So the 'pattern' is done?  If you're not happy with it (I should think I would have about 5 goes at something like this before I am happy with it) you can always go to DELETE, confirm with an OK .. and then try again.

When we're happy with it we have to SAVE it.  You SAVE it to a USER number.  There is one more thing you could do before saving it, and that is to change the Style's NAME.  Otherwise when you use it you don't really know whether it's your Style or the original.

Go to the BASIC screen and you will see INPUT NAME, bottom left.



Using the Data Control Buttons under the screen you re-name your Style in the usual way.

If you wanted to SAVE your work you would go to the SAVE screen, SAVE it to eg. USER 1, and confirm with OK.



But more on this later as we haven't finished yet!  We have only done one PART .. the BASS.  And we still have to do the 'Arpeggio' PART and the 'Repeating Piano' PART.

But I will finish this post by saying one thing (which you may be worried about).  The 'default' STYLES in the section on the left remain 'as is' at all times.  Nothing you do by playing about with the Style will affect the original.  Think of it like this.  The original is copied into ACCOMP. PROGRAM, and appears on the screen.  You make changes to it.  This is then SAVED to a USER slot, where you can access it.  Nothing is 'permanent' about a USER slot.  If you load in another floppy disk it will replace those USER slots with what's on the floppy disk.  So when we have finished making the changes to this STYLE we should SAVE it to a floppy disk track.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2020, 01:19:42 AM »
So what we now have is a 'new' STYLE based on the original 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B.  So far, only the Bass 'voice' and 'pattern of the bass part' have been changed.

Here is a DEMO of the original Style followed by the 'changed' Style .. which is then repeated so you can hear it again.

DEMO of the original 6/8 Ballad 1, followed by the new one: Repeated.

Listening to this, we clearly haven't got an 'arpeggio' playing anywhere in the background .. so we have to put one in.  But where?  Remembering that we have to DELETE what is currently in one of those slots before we can put a new 'pattern' in, it would be best to choose one that hasn't got anything we may want to bring into play later. 

I have opted to put my 'arpeggio' into PHRASE 2.  I had said earlier that any PART can be put into any of those slots.  The 'label' at the top only gives an indication of what type of pattern is probably in there.  As an 'arpeggio' is a 'pattern' I reckon PHRASE 2 will be as good a place as any to put it.

First make sure that in the BASIC screen, MAIN B is highlighted (selected).  I want to have a Grand Piano playing my arpeggio, so click the button by VOICE and by clicking the appropriate buttons under the screen in the PHRASE 2 column, change the Voice in PHRASE 2 to Grand Piano.  We need to set a VOLUME too in the PHRASE 2 column.  I reckon 21 will be about right, but we can always change it later if needs be.  Then press the button by RECORD, and by pressing the appropriate button under the screen in the PHRASE 2 column .. DELETE Phrase 2. 

We are now ready to RECORD our arpeggio.  I will start the arpeggio on the E above middle C, and go up to top E .. and back down again.  Listen to what I want in this DEMO.

Click this LINK
Arpeggio to put into PHRASE 2

Or as I have it my head, counting the beats in the bar ...



.. which Peter has kindly converted to 'proper music' as this:



Now before we get carried away and actually play this arpeggio I have some news for you.  We don't actually play these particular notes for the arpeggio as there is another thing we have to consider.  Which requires a slight diversion for me to explain it.  So I'll do this in my next post.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2020, 06:57:57 PM »
Short diversion .. remembering that a short diversion always takes you the long way round!

Remember those first keyboards they made?  They had one major problem.  Major chords, fine.  When you played a three fingered chord with the left hand you got a major chord playing in the backing.  Minor chords, fine.  But there was a problem when playing a 7th chord.  You would just get that major chord playing in the backing .. not a 7th chord.  So play eg. G C E (an inversion of the C chord) and you got G C E sounding in the backing.  But add a Bb into the mix so you are playing a C7 chord and all you heard was that G C E again.  A 7th chord is such an important chord that just to have a major chord playing again was unacceptable. 

So what did they do about it?  They made one of the notes a multipurpose note.  As all backing part 'patterns' have to be done in the key of C they decided that they would use the note of B as a 'multipurpose note'.  This means that the note of B is not a 'proper' note.  How it works is like this.  You use the note of B in your 'pattern' and their programming plays that note as a C if you are playing a C chord; a B (the note you would expect to be played) if you play a CMaj7 chord; and a Bb if you are playing a C7 chord.  So that B is not a 'fixed' note but plays a different note depending on what chord you are playing with your left hand.

What does this mean?  It means that when you play a backing PART play the note of B instead of the C in your 'pattern'.  Then you will get Major chords, Maj7th chords and 7th chords playing the correct notes in the backing.

End of short diversion ...

So with the above in mind, this means that for our arpeggio the notes we actually play are ...



... or as in Peter's music score ...



.. which looks very much to me like an arpeggio on Em .. which of course it is. 
And it sounds like this (and this is what you should play as the arpeggio backing PART):

Click the below to listen.
The actual arpeggio backing PART you play

In this next DEMO you can hear what the arpeggio actually sounds like when you play with the left hand:
(a) a Major 7th chord (eg. FMaj7) .. followed by
(b) a Major chord (eg. F) .. and
(c) a 7th chord (eg. F7)

Click the below to listen.
The notes you hear when playing the three chords mentioned above.

You can hear from this that you have made one backing 'pattern' and ended up with multiple arpeggios depending on the chord you play with your left hand.  In fact, not only the three chords mentioned above, but you will get a Minor arpeggio if you play a Minor chord; an Augmented arpeggio if you play an Augmented chord; a Diminished arpeggio if you play a Diminished chord etc.  And all that from just creating one original 'pattern'.  Clever bit of software programming to get all those harmonies out of just a few recorded notes.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2020, 02:38:20 PM »
What we have so far in creating a 'bespoke' STYLE for What A Wonderful World is a new Bass PART in BASS; and an arpeggio in PHRASE 2.  There is a third element I want to hear in this Style, which is a guitar playing a chord on the 'off-beat'.  I thought we had something like this in CHORD 2.  Nearly!  Although there is a guitar playing on the off-beat, on the fourth beat it is intermingled with a few random notes.  No matter, you might think.  But now we have an arpeggio playing in the backing, those extra notes in CHORD 2 interfere with what our arpeggio is playing, and just cause confusion.

This is what is in the original CHORD 2 slot.  Listen to those few sliding notes in the pattern.

Click the below to listen
The 'pattern' of the original CHORD 2 PART

I just want a 'straight' off-beat; so I have DELETED CHORD 2 and keeping the same Voice and Volume I have programmed in a 'straight' off-beat.  The notes I have played as a chord are the G above middle C; the B above it; and the E above top C.

Why the B?  Well, this is the 'multipurpose' note and we are using that instead of C.  You can read about why we do this in my Short Diversion above.

Again, Peter has written the music score for what I have played, below.



... and you can listen to it here:

Click the below to listen
Straight 'off-beat' in CHORD 2

This is the STYLE we now have for What A Wonderful World.  A new BASS Part; an arpeggio in PHRASE 2; and an 'off-beat' guitar chord in CHORD 2 .. we shall do a 'repeating piano' later.

In the DEMO below I am playing just a few chords to show you what the STYLE sounds like so far.  And I want to prove to you that the one off 'patterns' we have created do indeed translate into the correct notes based on the chord being played.  Very clever that the computer programming does this.  I have played the chords F; F+ (ie. F A C#); Bb; Bbm; F; C7; F.

And as you may have realised from listening to what I play, I like to have a 'Voice' allocated to the Lower (left of split) so that a voice 'sounds' along with the STYLE backing part.  In this instance I have chosen HORN.  So the first half of the DEMO below is the STYLE only; and the second is with my 'Horn' applied as well.

Click the below to listen
DEMO with some chords using the STYLE we have created so far.

That's getting to be something I would want to hear as a backing when playing What A Wonderful World.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2020, 02:08:26 PM »
Here is a summary of what I have done so far.

1.  I have listened to Louis Armstrong singing What A Wonderful World on YouTube and noticed two distinct backings his bands are playing.  In one, an arpeggio; in the other a 'repeating piano'.
2.  I have looked through the default STYLES in the AR for a suitable one to use; have realised that the time signature of the music is 6/8, and only found one 6/8 STYLE in my AR that I could use .. and that is 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B.  This is what the 'default' STYLE sounds like.

Click the below to listen.
DEMO playing a few chords in the original 6/8 Ballad 1 Variation B STYLE.

This doesn't exactly inspire me to play this tune.  I'm not keen on that 'busy' bass line for this song; it has no 'arpeggios' in the backing; and no 'repeating piano'.  So I set about changing this Style.
3.  I have first made sure that the Style I want to make adjustments to is displayed on the screen; you then press and hold the ACCOMP. PROGRAM button on the right of the screen, whilst at the same time pressing the STYLE tab again.  This loads the Style into ACCOMP. PROGRAM ready for you to work on it.
4.  In the BASIC screen I changed MAIN A (the ‘default’) to MAIN B.  I then went to VOICE and changed the BASS voice from Fingered Bass to Acoustic Bass.
5.  Then clicked the button by RECORD.  In the BASS slot I DELETED the Bass PART.  Then, making sure I had no other 'voices' sounding apart from the Acoustic Bass one, I recorded the new Bass 'pattern'.  You do this by pressing the START and watching the TEMPO clock go through a measure (and then it repeats itself).  You play your 'pattern' to the end of the 'measure' .. and you must not carry on beyond the measure and play anything on that first beat of the bar when it comes round again on the loop.  If you do, you will get a double-whammy on that first beat.  The written music I have included is just to get the general idea of what notes to play in the pattern.  Ignore that final bar showing in the sheet music.  You listen to what you have recorded, and if you are happy with what you hear, press the START again to stop it.  If you're not happy, once you've stopped it you'll have to DELETE it all and do it again.
6.  Deleted what was in CHORD 2 and replaced it with a guitar playing a straight 'off beat' right through the whole measure.
7.  I then set about putting my 'arpeggio' into PHRASE 2.  By pressing VOICE I chose a Grand Piano for my arpeggio.  Checked the VOLUME and put it up to 21.  Next, I DELETED what is in PHRASE 2. Pressed the START and watched the TEMPO clock go round the measure a couple of times while I composed myself to play the arpeggio pattern at the start of the measure.  Played my arpeggio .. remembering to use the B note instead of a C.  Listened through the loop a few times to make sure it sounded OK, then pressed the START to stop it.
8.  I have then gone back to the BASIC screen, and using INPUT NAME (press the appropriate button under the screen) have named it WONDER WORLD.
9.  Pressed the SAVE button and 'saved' my Style to eg. USER 1.  Gave it a name first using INPUT NAME so I could identify it later.  I named this STYLE with the arpeggio Wonder World.

I still haven't done my 'repeating piano' but thought I would do that by replacing the PHRASE 2 in the Style I have just done.  The idea of having all those various PARTS in a STYLE is so that when building a song up you can have all the PARTS going.  Well, I would never want to hear both my arpeggio and repeating piano together, so to avoid that happening I am creating a separate Style that has the repeating piano.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2020, 07:21:59 PM »
Continuing with my topic on creating PARTS in a STYLE ...

Having created one STYLE with a changed BASS PART; an 'off beat guitar chord' in CHORD 2; and an ARPEGGIO in PHRASE 2; I SAVED that to USER 1 (having given it a name to identify it using INPUT NAME).  Once 'saved' to USER 1 it will remain there for me to access it and use it.  I can now continue making changes to my Style.  BASS and CHORD 2 will remain the same, but I want to replace my 'arpeggio' in PHRASE 2 with a 'repeating piano'.  So I now press the button next to RECORD, and by pressing the appropriate buttons under the screen in PHRASE 2 I DELETE the arpeggio I had put in there.



The 'repeating piano' I shall put in there will sound like this:

Click the below to listen.
The 'repeating piano'

Peter has done the music score for this, as below:



But of course although this is what we want the final repeating piano to sound like, these are not the actual notes we play in ACCOMP. PROGRAM.  We have to remember that the note of B is not a 'proper' note.  It is a 'multipurpose' note and we play it instead of C.

So what we actually play is GBE, and the music score for this is below:



So now we move the highlight in PHRASE 2 up to REC; press the START and listen to the measure going round a couple of loops (you can see the loops going round by watching the TEMPO screen), and when you're ready for action record that repeating piano for the whole of the measure, taking care not to play anything when it gets back to 1:1.   Listen to what you have recorded as it goes round a couple of loops, and then press the START again to stop it playing (START is an ON/OFF 'toggle switch').  If you're not happy with what you hear, go back up to DEL and delete what you have just done.  Try again and see if it's any better.

The difficulty with doing a repeating chord like this is to get your playing 'even' as you play the notes.  If you can't get them playing evenly 'on the beat' then there is a way of getting all those notes to play exactly 'on the beat'.  Technology again!  What I am going to explain now, you can do for any of the PARTS you create .. to get your notes to be exactly 'on the beat' even though you didn't quite manage to do that in the first instance.  I could have used this technology for my BASS Part; or for my 'off beat' chord in CHORD 2; or for my arpeggio in PHRASE 2.  More often than not I choose not to use this technology because I find that having things exactly on the beat sounds too regimented.  But I think that this repeating piano does need to be exactly on the beat for the whole measure.

So I shall now explain how to use another function on the ACCOMP. PROGRAM screen, called EDIT, which is on the right of the screen. 

This will be continued in my next post ...
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2020, 11:33:21 PM »
To EDIT a PART you must first have that PART on REC.  So as I am working on PHRASE 2, that PART must be on REC.

Press the EDIT button to the right of the screen.  This is what you see.



The expression Yamaha use to carry out the process of making sure all those notes you played are exactly 'to the beat' is QUANTIZE.  Hence the words PART QUANTIZE in the illustration above ie. 'QUANTIZE the PART' .. the PART that is on REC.

We next have to identlfy the duration of the note from the musical symbols shown.  If I was playing a Bass part at 4/4 with four beats to the bar, then I would choose the crotchet (the one highlighted in black in the diagram).  If I was playing a Waltz and was playing three notes in a bar I would choose the one just underneath it.  But this STYLE is 6/8 time, and I am playing my chords in groups of three semiquavers, so the one to choose in this case is the one indicated below:


So highlight that one by pressing the appropriate button under the screen .. and then press the button under the screen corresponding to EXEC (execute).  You will be asked if you are sure?  Confirm with OK.

Now press the START to listen to it. Sound OK?  Are all the notes you played now playing exactly to the beat?
Note:
  If you chose the wrong symbol then the whole thing will be up the spout .. and there is no way back.  You'd have to DELETE your PART and go through the whole process of recording it again.  And next time choose a different symbol in EDIT!  (This statement is made with feeling!)

If this is what you are expecting to hear, then SAVE it eg. to USER 2.  Using INPUT NAME I have called this version of my STYLE (with the repeating piano) Wonder Wrld 2.  So that's in USER 2.
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Hugh Wallington

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Re: Analysing a piece of music .. creating Style PARTS.
« Reply #22 on: Today at 12:09:27 AM »
Now press and release the ACCOMP. PROGRAM to come out of it.  If you haven't SAVED what you have been doing it will ask you if you really do want to leave the program.  Confirm with OK if you don't want to SAVE what you have been doing.  If you do, then CANCEL and go back and SAVE it.
Note:  If you have saved your work then you won't get this message.

Now we need to find our STYLES so that we can use them.

Press the 1 on the right in the STYLE section.  This brings up all the available Styles on the screen.  What we are looking for is USER.  If USER is showing on the screen, then press the button next to it.  If not, you will have to 'scroll' left or right until USER does appear on the screen.

Having got USER showing at the top of the display, we need to press the appropriate button under the screen for the User Number we want.  You would press the button under the screen (top row) under USER 1 for the arpeggio; and the button under USER 2 for the 'repeating piano'.

I will press USER 2 and let you hear what our 'repeating piano' sounds like .. particularly as we played a B in our chord.  As I said, that B is a 'multipurpose note'.  So if you listen to the below you will hear what that chord actually sounds like when I hold down:
(a)  .. a Cnat7 chord;
(b)  .. a C chord;
(c)  .. a C7 chord.

This is the whole point of playing that B in ACCOMP. PROGRAM.  You do subsequently get the correct harmony in your backing.

Click the below to listen.
What the 'repeating piano'sounds like when playing the chords as above

Now we'll listen to what those two STYLES we created, Wonder World and Wonder Wrld2 sound like when chosen from USER 1 and USER 2.  Listen out for the ARPEGGIO, and then the REPEATING PIANO.

Click the below to listen.
Using the two Styles Wonder World and Wonder Wrld2

That's more like it!  Just the backing I want to hear for playing It's A Wonderful World!
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