Author Topic: No__132__Developing and Utilising Relative Pitch  (Read 32 times)

Peter Anderson

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No__132__Developing and Utilising Relative Pitch
« on: July 29, 2020, 06:22:51 am »

In Peters Pearls #131   I stated.....
Quote
              5            Learn relative pitch


Relative pitch gives you the ability to identify or re-create a musical note by comparing it to a reference note.    Providing, that is, that you can identify the distance, or the interval, between the two notes.

This even works with intervals where notes have been raised or lowered by a semi-tone.

Solfège gives you a solid and an easy system for relative pitch.
Surely this is something all of us aspire to be able to do.



                     To open that particular post in a new window, click on this link:

                  http://www.ar-group.org/smforum/index.php?topic=3720.msg13818#msg13818

                 

                      but to open Peters Pearls # 131 at the very beginning, click on this link

                  http://www.ar-group.org/smforum/index.php?topic=3720.0


Most of us may already have a good appreciation of Relative Pitch, which enables us to accurately recognise intervals between notes.  Many can sing or hum that interval, even if they cannot tell what the actual interval is.
Some men might be able to sing thirds above a melody line, to provide a suitable tenor.  Others might even be more adventurous, particularly if they have sung tenor from a score for many years, so have gained much experience.

You don't need to possess the gift of perfect pitch, to be able to do this.

You may have been asked (especially since you are recognised by others as an organist) to start a song, like 'Happy Birthday'.
In the past, in such circumstances, if I am not certain of the key, I've either started too high or too low, with embarrassing consequences, and perhaps you will identify with this.

However, it is possible to pitch a note perfectly.

I will tell you how I have done it, for many years, later, but in the next Reply, you will find a useful link to a parallel Pearl.

Peter
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Peter Anderson

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Re: No__132__Developing and Utilising Relative Pitch
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2020, 06:19:59 am »
Running in parallel with this Pearl is another one, and in order to read about Perfect and Relative Pitch see Peters Pearls #133, and to open it in a new window, click on this link:

http://www.ar-group.org/smforum/index.php?topic=3741.0

In the next Reply, I'll tell you how I find the correct pitch to start a song.

Peter
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Peter Anderson

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Re: No__132__Developing and Utilising Relative Pitch
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2020, 06:21:15 am »
In order to pitch a tune at the right level, or to find the correct starting note, I used a well known song.

I chose
          Somewhere Over The Rainbow
        because it suited my voice range admirably and used Middle and high C.

Here is the music:

             

I surprised myself, with how accurately I could find Middle C, at anytime and without access to a keyboard or other tuning method.

You might find it easier and more beneficial to actually sing the solfège notes, as that will help you with gauging intervals.


             


Try it for yourself.      Test your own ability by just singing, or humming, the first two notes and confirming your accuracy by playing those same two notes on your Yamaha AR.

If you want to understand or use solfege, then click on this link, to open the Pearl in a new window:

http://www.ar-group.org/smfocrum/index.php?topic=3720.0

How well did you do, pitching Middle and High C?

Were you surprised with your effort?

Try it again in a few hours!

I also discovered that I could do this silently, in my head, and immediately hit the right note to tackle a tune,  in the right key first time!

In the following Reply I will share another song to easily obtain the complete C major chord.

Peter
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